Bombardier CRJ700 Training

Bombardier CRJ700 Training

Bombardier CRJ700 training for pilots is accomplished through a type rating course covering the CRJ700's systems. Initial pilot training for the CRJ700 lasts around 20 days, depending on the provider. CRJ700 training will cover all the main components such as the Flight Management System (FMS), Full Authority Engine Digital Control (FADEC), Flight Control Panel and all CRJ700 systems. Emergency situations will be covered in CRJ700 training. Special event training (Recovery from unusual altitudes, etc) is recommend by the FAA's FSB for CRJ700 training.

If you already have a CRJ series (CL-65) type rating (excludes the CRJ1000) you can transition to the CRJ700 in an easier fashion by completing a differences course.

More Information on the CRJ700 type rating course can be found on our Bombardier CRJ700 type rating page.

Bombardier CRJ700 Training Providers

One of the main training providers for the CRJ700 aircraft is Bombardier. Bombardier provides a complete suite of CRJ700 training courses at their Montreal facility. FlightSafety International (St. Louis location and many other companies also provide CRJ700 training. CAE also provides training for airlines and persons at it's locations around the world. In Pheonix, Arizona, CAE provides CRJ700 training for US Airways Express and others.
The Bombardier CRJ700 training cost will depend on the type of course you need. Most regional aircraft type ratings cost in the range of $20,000 USD.

Bombardier CRJ700 Maintenance Training
Bombardier also provides CRJ700 maintenance training in Montreal. Initial type, Avionics type, airframe & powerplant on-site and power plant run up training are some of the maintenance courses they provide.

For reference: Bombardier CRJ700 training is also referred to as the Canadair CRJ700 training, Canadair Regional Jet 700 training and the CL-600-2C10 training because of different names for the aircraft.

Bombardier CRJ700 Training Page Photo

Above Bombardier CRJ700 Training page photo by redlegsfan21 on Flickr. Photo (only) released under a Creative Commons License.